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Yemen

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Muslimtrade Network members
about Yemen.

Y  E  M  E  N 



 

1. GENERAL PRESENTATION:  
1.1 General characteristics
1.2 General Information
1.3 Legal framework of trade relations


2. TRADE STRUCTURE (1996):  
2.1 Main imported and exported products
2.2 Principal trading partners


3. FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS:  
3.1.Imports regulations
3.2 Exports regulations
3.3 Other formalities and documents


4. FINANCIAL REGULATIONS OF FOREIGN TRADE OPERATIONS:  
4.1 Banking system
4.2 Foreign exchange system
4.3 Methods and means for international settlement


5. CUSTOMS TAXATION:  
5.1 Applicable duties and taxes


6. FOREIGN TRADE LOGISTIC:*  
6.1 International Transports
6.2 Telecommunications
6.3 Distribution System

  
7. USEFUL ADDRESS: *

GENERAL PRESENTATION 

1.1 General characteristics:

Official name: Republic of Yemen
Surface 528,000 Km²
Population 15.3 millions inhabitants (1996)
Density 29 inhabitants per square kilometer 
Capital  Sanaa
Climate The weather in Northern and central highlands is warm in summer but cold in winter. Tihama and Southern coasts including Aden, are hot, humid but arid. Eastern plains and desert are hot, arid and hostile.
Main holidays January 1st, September26th , Prophet’s birthday*, Eid Al-Fitr*, Eid Al-Adha* and Islamic new year.
Weekly day off Friday

* Variable dates

1.2 General Information

Language

Arabic is the official language, English is also used in official and business circles

Currency

Yemeni Rial (YR) 130 YR= 1 US$ (1996)

Local time

GMT + 3 hours

Working hours

· Government offices: From 8h to 14h / From Saturday to Thursday. 

· Commercial establishments: From 8h to 12h and from 15h 30 to 19h30 from Saturday to Thursday

1.3 Legal framework of trade relations:

Yemen is member of the following international organizations:

Organization of the Islamic Conference (O.I.C); 
United Nations Organization (U.N); 
League of Arab State; 
Group – 77 

Yemen - along with Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Mauritania, Somalia, Sudan, and Syria – is member of the Arab Common Market established in 1965 after the conclusion of the Agreement of Arab Economic Unity. Yemen has also signed a cooperation agreement with the European Union within the framework of which both parties are granted most-favored – nation treatment.

TRADE STRUCTURE (1996): 

2.1 Main imported and exported products:

Main imported products

Main exported products

Textiles

Crude Oil

Petroleum Products

Coffee

Sugar

Cotton

Grains

Hides & skins

Machinery and chemicals

Vegetables

Manufactures

Dried and salted fish

2.2 Principal trading partners:

Main customers

Main suppliers

U.S.A

Saudi Arabia

Italy

France

U.K

U.K

Saudi Arabia

U.S.A

France

Australia

FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS: 

3.1.Imports regulations:

Import licenses are not required, but the import of pork and pork products, coffee, alcohol, narcotics, fresh fruit and vegetables, weapons and explosives and rhinoceros horn is prohibited.

At the import level, the following documents are required:

Commercial invoice:  

Three (3) copies of the ordinary commercial invoice should accompany shipments. The invoice should contain a full and accurate description of the goods, the marks and numbers, value of the merchandise, country of origin and net and gross weight.

Certificate of origin:  

A separate certificate of origin is required for shipments to Yemen. The general form sold by commercial stationers is acceptable.

Bill of Lading:  

There are no regulations specifying the form or number of bills of lading required for any particular shipment. A bill of lading customarily shows the name of the shipper, the name and address of the consignee, port of destination, description of the goods, the listing of the freight and other charges, the number of bills of lading in the full set, and the date and signature of the carrier’s official acknowledging receipt on board of the goods for shipment. 

3.2 Exports regulations:

Exporters must contact the Yemeni authorities to obtain information on the modalities and legalization that should be applied.

3.3 Other formalities and documents:

Health certificate:  

A health certificate is required for shipments to Yemen of animal stocks, food and agricultural products

Free sale certificate:  

Imports of pharmaceuticals require a free sale certificate stating that the commodities in question are in free circulation in the country of Export. 

Marking:  

A mark of origin must appear on any merchandise labeled with English wording that could possibly be considered misleading as to the true origin of the goods.

Shipping restrictions:  

All freight insurance on imports must be placed in Yemen.

Packing:  

Goods should be packed securely to withstand rough handling and pilferage 

4. FINANCIAL REGULATIONS OF FOREIGN TRADE OPERATIONS: 

4.1 Banking system:

The central bank of Yemen, based in Sanaa, is the republic’s monetary authority, overseeing the banking sector and controlling official foreign exchange transactions. 

The major Yemeni commercial banks are the Yemen Bank for reconstruction and development and the national bank of Yemen. Foreign Banks active in the republic include France’s Bank Indosuez , Pakistan’s United Bank and Jordan’s Arab Bank.

4.2 Foreign exchange system:

Commercial Banks are allowed to purchase foreign exchange domestically from customers and tourists and to hold a percentage of foreign exchange purchased to effect import payments on behalf of the central bank. There are no taxes or subsidies on purchases or sales of foreign exchange. 

Under the investment law, investors are permitted to hold foreign-currency accounts in Yemeni Banks; they are entitled to customs exemptions on capital imports of five to ten years.

4.3 Methods and means for international settlement:

Commercial banks are authorized to open letters of credit for the importation of most goods, provided that such imports are self financing; these banks may accept licenses issued by the ministry of supply and Trade in respect of these imports without approval from the central bank.

CUSTOMS TAXATION 

Yemen’s tariff schedule is based on the Customs Cooperation Council Nomenclature.

5.1 Applicable duties and taxes 

Customs duties:  

Yemen’s tariff schedule consists of ad-valorem duties ranging from 5 percent to 30 percent. Most food products are dutiable at 15 percent; 

Preferential duties:  

Yemen has a cooperation agreement with the European Union whereby both parties are granted most-favored-nations treatment and promote reciprocal commercial and economic relations.

Sudan and Yemen agreed in principal to join the Arab Common Market under an arrangement that would provide for 50 percent initial reduction in duties on imports from member states.

Indirect taxes:  

Imports of industrial input are subject to an excise tax. All imports are assessed a 1 percent tax for reconstruction related to earthquakes.

Free trade zone:  

A free trade zone is established on the port of Aden; Goods may be enter duty-free but are charged the applicable duty, and they subsequently enter imports into the customs territory of Yemen.

Entry and re-Export: 

Equipment may be imported temporarily for use in a specific project but must be re-exported once the project is completed.

FOREIGN TRADE LOGISTIC  

6.1 International Transports:

Maritime transports:  

The port of Aden used to be one of the world’s busiest bunkering and transshipping points. With substantial investment in new equipment and the creation of a free zone, the government is hoping to regenerate the port as a potential hub for shipping en route between the "tiger" economies of the pacific rim, the Indian ocean, East and north Africa, the middle East and Europe. Hodeidah on the red sea coast is still Yemen’s largest dry cargo port. Mukallah, Mokha and Ras Issa are also important ports.

Air transports:  

Yemen is well connected internally by air, with airports in most of the major cities. The national Airline is to purchase two long-haut jets for routes to the U.S.A, Europe and South-East Asia. The major international airports are Sanaa, Aden and Rayan (Mukallah).

Land transports:  

in 1990 there were 4937 km of paved roads and 10509 km of unpaved roads. The construction of a metalled road linking the Omani road Network with al-Ghaidah on the Yemeni side of the border is underway. 

6.2 Telecommunications

By the end of 1996, the number of working lines increased to 316,000. Existing analogue systems will be converted to digital systems. A fibber-optic cable links Sanaa with Saudi Arabia and TAIZ, and an undersea cable linking Aden to Djibouti came into service in 1995.

6.3 Distribution System 

Only Yemeni citizens or sole proprietorships owned by Yemeni nationals may be licensed as agents. The contract between principal and agent must stipulate the amount of commission payable for the services of the agent. 

Foreign firms may open branch offices in Yemen to perform certain functions.

USEFUL ADDRESS: 

Organization and Public Establishments

Address

Tel

Fax

Telex

Central Bank of Yemen P.O. Box 59, Ali Abd  

al-Mughni St. – Sanaa
(9671) 274371  (1)274131 2280
Ministry of Supply and Trade P.O. Box 1804 – Sanaa (9671) 252471 / 252340 (1)251570  
Ministry of Industry P.O. Box. 1804 – Sanaa (9671) 202770 / 202769 (1)202249  
Ministry of Planning and Development P.O. Box. 175 – Sanaa (9671) 250101 

through 6
(1)251503  
National Company for Foreign Trade P.O. Box. 90 – Crater, Aden (9672) 42793 (2)42631 8960




 
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